Thursday, September 13, 2012

Link Round Up

I've been reading some great articles and posts around the interwebz lately, and thought I'd share some with you all. Nothing like sharing the love!

Libraries: They're about builing stronger, more just communities Well. I'm a lawyer, and a library lover, so of course I think this is fantastic: "This fall, Pro Bono Net is producing four national training webinars for public and public law librarians about free, online resources for people with legal needs. The Libraries and Access to Justice Webinar Series kicks off this Thursday, Sept. 13, with an overview of the legal information needs among low-income Americans and why libraries are essential partners in access to justice."

O. Henry postage stamp
O. Henry Pardon Application This post is from a Texas law blog I like. The blogger has been on a mission to posthumously pardon O. Henry, short story writer extraordinaire. "The pardon petition idea first bubbled to the surface after President Obama quoted the great writer last year while pardoning a pair of Thanksgiving turkeys in an annual ritual that IMO makes a mockery of  executive clemency powers. The Constitution's framers considered a pivotal check and balance to excesses of the criminal justice system. In Federalist Paper #74, Alexander Hamilton wrote that, "The criminal code of every country partakes so much of necessary severity, that without an easy access to exceptions in favor of unfortunate guilt, justice would wear a countenance too sanguinary and cruel." In modern times, though, executive clemency, especially at the federal level, has itself become a cruel joke to those who seek it."
Interested in signing your name in support? Here's the petition.

The (Imagined) Woman Reader and Male Anxiety Jenny McPhee writes "Male anxiety about the woman reader is as old as reading itself. In Belinda Jack's new book The Woman Reader, she meticulously explores the manifestation of this anxiousness historically. Some men encouraged and cultivated their women readers: Ovid created characters such as Byblis and Philomela to show his empathy for the female plight. Others, such as Lucian and Juvenal, wrote biting satires expressing their disgust for literate and intelligent women.... Rousseau, in his Émile: or, On Education, wrote that women should read and "cultivate their minds" but only enough to please their husbands. The eighteenth-century writer Samuel Richardson had an extensive female readership and kept up correspondence with them, often asking for their input and opinions. "My acquaintance lies chiefly among the ladies," he wrote, "I care not who knows it.""
If you want to read some of McPhee's fiction, I recommend No Ordinary Matter, which I read and reviewed earlier this year.

1 comment:

Anonymous said...

Video games has quickly overtaken the world. People everywhere find it enjoyable, relaxing, competitive and even educational! There is something for everyone in the world of video games. This article has some suggestions on how to get more out of your online gaming experience.

Turn off chatting capabilities on games for kids that are young. You should not expose your young kids to these types of communications. If the game won't let you disable chat, don't buy it. If you can't figure it out, search online for more information or talk to the people in the store.

Computers allow you to play games, too. There are many games that you can get on the Internet, with similar quality also available in a ps3 option.

To become an expert at any game, you need to practice, a lot! You probably won't be an expert your first time playing a game. Give yourself some time so you can practice; never give up on practicing until you get really good at it. Before you know what's going on, you'll be able to play like a pro.

It is important to take breaks and avoid excessive computer game playing. It's fairly easy to get addicted to a particular game, and this isn't healthy so you must get away from it every once in a while. Gaming is meant to be an enjoyable experience. Should you feel that addiction is an issue, speak to a medical professional about help.

Parents must always verify the ratings on games. A lot of games look like they are okay for kids, but they are not. It's important to not only check the rating, but also the actual objectionable material (e.g. language, suggestive themes) that caused it to get that rating.

The industry is going forward and gamers are too. Gamers want a huge selection, super-fast access and great prices. If you see a game you want, but don't like the price tag, just wait patiently for a bit. As time passes, the price of the games will decrease so the manufacturer will still be able to record high sales volume.

Video games can be used to get fit. Physical motion sensing technology is spreading through the industry. Today, you can get your exercise in through certain sports-related video games like yoga. You can get in shape at home doing this.

Make sure you duck and take cover before reloading your weapon. A lot of time people get killed when they are just not controlling their character. Be smart and avoid this. Find cover first, and then reload your weapon.

Check the Internet for suggestions and tricks for you favorite games. When you get stuck somewhere in a game, it can frustrate you and maybe even make you give up. Consulting a walkthrough or asking other gamers on a message board is the surest way to conquer that tough level and start enjoying the game again.

Figure out how to operate the safety and parental controls of any gaming system that comes into your home. You can likely make adjustments that keep kids from viewing mature content. Some allow each gaming profile to be customized separately, allowing adults to enjoy games not meant for younger audiences.

You can get many hours of enjoyment from many different kinds of computer games. Use this advice to make the best from your online game purchases. The world of video gaming has evolved into a highly competitive market with games for everyone.